Ipswich Unemployed Action.

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Archive for the ‘Unemployment’ Category

While Amber Rudd is Elsewhere Universal Credit Crisis Continues.

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Public interest in Universal Credit has not dampened down.
Though  Amber Rudd has does not pay much attention.

A steady drip of really bad stories continues.

This site would like to hear from people on the issues around the  Universal Credit Job Search and the Journal.
We were told, or least got the impression,  that the transfer of millions of people already on benefits to UC  was being halted.
Or rather,

Ms Rudd will delay asking MPs to approve the transfer of three million benefit claimants to UC, and instead plans to move just 10,000 onto the system this summer as part of a trial to study its effectiveness.

Independent. 11th of January.

Other important changes include pressing ahead with a pilot to support 10,000 people from ‘legacy benefits’ on to Universal Credit in a test and learn approach.

There remains this:

What is natural migration

‘Migration’ is the word in common use for the process by which a claimant with a current award of a ‘legacy’ benefit (income-based job-seeker’s allowance (JSA), income-related employment and support allowance (ESA), income support(IS), housing benefit(HB), child tax credit (CTC) and working tax credit (WTC)) has that award (or those awards) terminated, instead being obliged to rely on UC for means-tested support. Under current plans, the DWP intends to start an official ‘managed migration’ process in 2019. This will see the DWP mandatorily terminating current legacy benefit awards and replacing that with a claim for UC. In this process, transitional protection will apply for those whose UC award is lower than their legacy benefit entitlement. The process is due to be complete by March 2022.

By contrast, ‘natural migration’ is the process by which a current claimant can end up, in effect, being obliged to claim UC instead of legacy benefits for means-tested support, completely outside of the managed migration process. No transitional protection will apply. Natural migration is possible at any time, including before 2019. It is more likely to occur in UC full service areas, but can occur in UC live service (or gateway) areas too.

This was announced last week, and, er, got buried under others news:

DWP not engaging with expert calls for change to Universal Credit

The Work and Pensions Committee is today launching a new inquiry into what the Government calls “natural migration”: the process by which people claiming existing benefits move onto Universal Credit if they have a change in their circumstances,

What is natural migration?

Universal Credit has now been rolled out to every Jobcentre in the country. This means that if people who are already claiming benefits under the old system have a change in their circumstances (for example, if they form part of a new couple, or separate from an existing partner), they can’t make a new claim for the old benefits. Instead, they have to make a whole new claim for Universal Credit.

The Government calls this “natural migration” to Universal Credit. People who transfer onto Universal Credit in this way aren’t eligible for any transitional protection payments and so may see a change in their income from benefits. For many people, this may be the first time that they discover that their income will change under Universal Credit.

Natural Migration inquiry launched

The Committee has heard concerns that:

  • the Government hasn’t given clear and comprehensive information about the “triggers” for “natural migration”
  • the absence of transitional protection means people might have to cope suddenly with a drop in income.

This is the latest stage in the Committee’s ongoing work on Universal Credit – which has already resulted in the Government making significant changes to the system

n its November report on so-called “managed migration” – the process of wholesale moving existing benefit claimants onto Universal Credit even if their circumstances haven’t changed  – the Committee called on the Government to publish an assessment of the impact of a sudden loss of income due to natural migration on different claimant groups, and then to look again at whether the triggers for natural migration are appropriate. In its official response to that report, published today alongside this new inquiry launch, the Government has refused to do that.

The Chair has written back to the Secretary of State with a series of questions about the Government’s response:

The Committee is disappointed and concerned by the Government’s failure to engage with its report and reasoning behind key recommendations, and intends to return to several of them including, now, the “triggers” for natural migration. The Department declined, again, to set tests that it will meet before managed migration begins. “Given that we, the NAO and SSAC all made this recommendation, this continued resistance is very disappointing.”

The Government’s response also does not address the central issue of who takes the risk in the transition to Universal Credit, with the Committee arguing repeatedly that it should be Government, making the huge reform, who assume the risk, not existing benefit claimants who include the most vulnerable people in our society. The Government says it’s simply impossible for it to move people over without requiring them to make a new claim, but “did not offer—and has not offered during our inquiry—any evidence” why.

DWP also appears strangely reluctant to acknowledge the key recommendation it did accept. The Committee had said DWP should not ask MPs to vote on new UC rules until it had listened to expert views on them. And that is what happened: rather than a vote before Christmas as the Government had originally planned, revised rules were published last week. The Chair was therefore very “surprised to read that the Government ‘does not accept this recommendation’, given that by the time the response arrived the Government had not only accepted the recommendation but also implemented it.”

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Written by Andrew Coates

January 29, 2019 at 1:18 pm

Universal Credit “quirk” means Hundreds of Thousands are threatened with Housing Underpayment.

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Universal Credit Achievement.

Food is bad enough.

But if there is one thing people really worry about, it’s housing.

You only have to walk around here to see why: figures in the doorways sleeping in evening.

People get anxious, to say the least, about threats such as having a ‘review’ of their cases when they get Personal Independence Payment.

Transferring to Universal Credit means a gap in money – making not just the rent hard to pay, but demands for the full rate of Council Tax.

All the benefits listed on the DWP site carry the potential to get taken away.

Sanctions are there to remind us, that like some bad nipper, we lose our supper and sweets because we haven’t done our homework.

You can see what can happen:

I don’t think those who’re not on the Dole realise just how small the amount we get weekly is:

Age JSA weekly amount
Up to 24 up to £57.90
25 or over up to £73.10
Couples (both aged over 18) up to £114.85

The  writer of this post lives in the centre of a large town, and doesn’t have to pay bus fares.

This is the cost of what is essential for anybody who wants to come to the library or the Job Centre on public transport (and Ipswich is cheap):

Ipswich Town Fares
One Zone (Pink) Two Zone (Yellow)
Single £1.00 £1.50
Return £1.90 £2.90

That’s quite wodge on top of all the other expenses.

Not that this kind of thing concerns her ladyship Amber Rudd:

Now there is this.

Universal Credit technicality threatens hundreds of thousands with Underpayment

Hundreds of thousands of social housing tenants on Universal Credit are set to have their housing costs underpaid in the next financial year due to a quirk in the calendar which means 53 weekly rent payments will fall due.

The article continues,

The National Housing Federation (NHF) is currently at loggerheads with the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) over the issue.

Many social landlords collect rent every Monday – and in 2019/20 there will be 53 Mondays.

However, the Universal Credit system will continue to account for 52 rent weeks over the year only, meaning that thousands of social tenants across the UK who pay their rent weekly will be one week short and face rent arrears.

The 53-week phenomenon last occurred in 2013/14. Then, fewer than 20,000 people were claiming Universal Credit but now there are more than 1.5 million.

As of August, around 290,000 social rented households were using Universal Credit to pay their rent, many on a weekly basis.

Housing association Bolton at Home estimates that its 4,000 tenants paying will be left a total of £300,000 short, while Rochdale Boroughwide Housing says 3,000 residents will have a gap of £220,000.

The Mirror also reports:

Universal Credit: Hundreds of thousands of people set to lose out on a week’s rent

Housing associations say the problem will hit tenants who pay rent weekly in 2019/20 – and demanded action from the DWP to close the “bizarre” loophole.

……..

Labour MP Ruth George, who has raised the issue face-to-face with DWP chief Amber Rudd, added: “Having 53 weeks of rent in a year is an anomaly of the system, it’s not anyone’s fault.

“So to refuse to compensate tenants on Universal Credit is a bizarre decision that will leave claimants even more out of pocket.”

The problem, raised by the NHF and first reported by Inside Housing, is expected to affect Universal Credit claimants who pay weekly rent once every six years.

The NHF says that because UC is paid monthly, it is calculated using a formula that effectively takes 52 of a claimant’s weekly rent payments and divides the total by 12.

But there are 52 weeks plus one day in each year. That means every six years or so, a tenant has to make 53 rent payments, not 52.

Written by Andrew Coates

January 25, 2019 at 5:04 pm

Claimants to Pay for Universal Credit Delay as Bishop Butler “Welcomes” Changes.

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Résultat de recherche d'images pour "moi, daniel blake"

A Film Loved Across Europe.

Last weekend when they showed I, Daniel Blake,  on the telly many people asked me if I had watched it.

I did not.

The reason is very simple: some of the scenes (which I have seen from clips that our contributors posted on this site) were part of my own life.

I refer to the one in which the bloke could not use the computer and had to be helped.

This happened to me when a mate, who is a joiner, and much more skilled than me in all kinds of things, asked me to help him use one for ‘Job Search‘.

I could add that when Universal Credit first came on the horizon a friend, who is a single parent, explained to me how her situation, small jobs, child care, was going to affect her.

Disaster.

This young women, it took her ages to go into the details, is going basically spend her life filling in forms – on-line naturally.

Us lot know first hand what the Dole is like, but this is beyond the usual stuff.

People here know this all too well.

There is a geezer I know, I saw him stocking up on Sainsbury’s Basics a few days back, who, live in dire straits.

In fact is was so bleeding obvious that it would take only some as thick as pig shit not to have guessed that Universal Credit would wreak havoc on people.

Back to the latest news:

Claimants will pay for universal credit delay

Guardian. 

The delay Amber Rudd announced in the roll-out may appear to be a concession to UC’s critics. But in fact it will cost some claimants dearly, says Patricia de Wolfe

Your leader on universal credit (Rudd’s adjustments are no solution to the serious problem of welfare reform, 12 January) is too kind to Amber Rudd. The delay she announced in the roll-out of universal credit (UC) to existing claimants of means-tested benefits may appear to be a concession to the benefit’s countless critics. But in fact it will cost some claimants dearly. Cynics might even regard the delay as a cost-saving measure for the government.

When existing claimants are eventually moved to UC in the course of what is known as managed migration, their previous level of benefit will be protected if it is higher than their UC entitlement (though it will not rise until their UC entitlement catches up with the amount they receive). But pending the managed migration, existing claimants whose circumstances change must claim UC without this protection: their previous benefits stop and they are treated as new UC claimants. There is no rationale for this distinction between “managed” and “natural” migration beyond stinginess.

A relevant change of circumstances for UC purposes might consist of a move to a different area, or a change in household composition or in employment status. Inevitably, as many years go, by some claimants’ capacity for work will lessen; some claimants will need to relocate; couples will form or split up; babies will be born. This means that the longer the managed migration of existing claimants is postponed, the more people who would be helped by transitional protection will have to forgo it.

For fairness, transitional protection should be introduced immediately for all claimants of means-tested benefits moving to UC, with compensation for those who have already lost out.

Patricia de Wolfe
London

Yet, steady on Padre, this type says this today.

Bishop Butler welcomes Universal Credit reform.

The Bishop of Durham, the Rt Revd Paul Butler, has welcomed the reforms to Universal Credit which were announced by the Government last week.

After the news that the two-child benefits cap for families with children born before the system began in 2017 would not be implemented, Bishop Butler said: “As a just and compassionate society, we believe that every child is a blessing and deserves to be treated equally.”

He went on: “I very much welcome today’s announcement that the two-child limit policy will not be extended to children born before the policy came into effect in April 2017. I also welcome the Government’s more considered approach to moving people on to Universal Credit from the old benefits system.

“I look forward to working with Ministers to continue reviewing these policies as part of a broader, coherent strategy to reduce child poverty, helping parents to give their children the best possible start in life.”

Ipswich Unemployed Action looks forward to working for MInisters’ downfall!

Written by Andrew Coates

January 18, 2019 at 9:47 am

Amber Rudd to Make Universal Credit, ” more compassionate and individual”.

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The Pantomime Season has not ended.

Benefits freeze likely to end in 2020, says Amber Rudd

Guardian.

Sky reports:

Tory welfare policy estimated to have cost poor working families hundreds of pounds

Further announcements expected during Ms Rudd’s first major speech as work and pensions secretary on Friday will include:

  • Steps to make weekly and fortnightly payments more accessible
  •  A new online system for private landlords to get rents paid directly to them
  •  Confirmation that the managed migration of claimants from legacy benefits to Universal Credit will be initially limited to a test group of 10,000 people

When asked about measures she hopes to bring forward in the future, Ms Rudd gave the clearest indication yet that the four-year benefit freeze, which has been in place since 2015, will not be renewed when it comes to an end next year.

“It was the right policy at the time, it’s got one more year to run, I look forward to it coming off,” she said, adding: “I do not expect that to be renewed at all.”

Ms Rudd’s hopes of one day leading her party were seen to have been dented when she was forced to resign as home secretary last year during the Windrush scandal.

More via Press Association.

Reforms will make Universal Credit more compassionate and individual – Rudd

The Work and Pensions Secretary also indicated that she expects the longstanding benefits freeze to end in 2020.

Amber Rudd has announced a set of reforms to the Government’s new Universal Credit, saying that the system she inherited was not as “effective” or “compassionate” as she wanted.

The Work and Pensions Secretary confirmed that she was delaying asking Parliament for permission to move three million people on to UC until next year, after a pilot of the transfer from existing benefits has been completed.

And she announced that controversial plans to apply a two-child benefit cap retrospectively to new Universal Credit (UC) claimants are to be scrapped, helping around 15,000 families.

Ms Rudd also signalled that an end is in sight to the longstanding benefit freeze introduced by former chancellor George Osborne in 2016, telling Sky News she did not expect it to be renewed in 2020.

She said it was not “reasonable” to impose the two-child cap – intended to force claimants to make decisions on whether they can afford a third child in the same way as those in work – on families which already have more than two offspring.

Given the comments on this Blog Dame Rudd has a long way to go before she changes the hated Universal Credit system.

Written by Andrew Coates

January 11, 2019 at 12:24 pm

Collapse of Universal Credit: “extension delayed”.

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Collapse amidst Universal Shame.

There’s a rush of reports on this.

I think we can get the gravity of it.

My friends, in low paid work  or out of work have been really affected by their Tory scheme.

Those of us on ‘legacy benefits’ – as if they were some of kind of toff’s  bequeath – were and are seriously concerned.

But I noticed when I last signed on and asked about it the person said basically the same thing.

Universal Credit rollout axed as controversial benefit set for overhaul

The next phase of the Universal Credit programme (UC) will be overhauled following widespread criticism of the extension of the flagship welfare reform.

Work and Pensions Secretary Amber Rudd is to scrap an imminent Commons vote on plans allowing all existing claimants of relevant benefits to be moved onto the new all-in-one payment.

Instead she plans to seek approval to move just 10,000 claimants onto UC to monitor the way the system works.

Influential committees in both Houses of Parliament had raised concerns about the plan to move around three million claimants onto UC and the Government faced losing a Commons vote on the “managed migration” programme.

Written by Andrew Coates

January 6, 2019 at 12:29 pm

The Sun Launches a “Campaign” to Make Universal Credit “Work”.

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Image result for protest at universal credit redcar

While Sun Bleats People Take to the Street.

The Current Bun has a way with weasel words,

Hard-working families are being punished for working and forced into debt due to the shambolic roll-out of Universal Credit – but The Sun’s got a plan to Make it Work

The government must act NOW to fix these problems, here’s what we demand:

  • Get paid faster: The government must slash the time Brits wait for their first Universal Credit payments from five to two weeks, helping stop 7 million from being pushed into debt.
  • Keep more of what you earn: The work allowance should be increased and the taper rate should be slashed from from 63p to 50p, helping at least 4 million families.
  • Don’t get punished for having a family: Parents should get the 85 per cent of the money they can claim for childcare upfront instead of being paid in arrears.

Like, really…

That will solve everything…

These stories are more its style:

Related image

You can’t help feeling the Murdoch Press has now changed to follow this example:

This might have some effect, as opposed to the Cor Blimey Wealthy Sun’s tears:

The Tories laid into it before it began:

Meanwhile a decent paper which has not just jumped on the bandwagon reports:

 

 

Written by Andrew Coates

December 17, 2018 at 12:22 pm

Universal Credit, it’s Official, “all types of claimants” “benefit from the improved, personalised, one-to-one support that Universal Credit offers.”

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DWP MInisters Discuss Universal Credit.

The Conservative Party is having a nervous breakdown.

But, when they’re not having lunch at the Drones’ Club to get away from it all, they are sticking to Bertie Wooster’s policy of stout denial.

On the 21st of November this was said,

Amber Rudd insisted Universal Credit was a ‘force for good’ today and insisted tweaks would ensure it gets ‘cash into people’s hands’ more quickly.

Today the Mirror reports,

Universal Credit leaves applicants “scavenging in bins at night for food”

A tortuous process to sign up, an interminable wait without money after it and vulnerable applicants sidelined – new report highlights the human fallout of the new payment system being inflicted on the country.

Now a report from debt charity Christians Against Poverty (CAP) has revealed the shocking human cost of the key failures of the system, as people fall through the gaps.

“Some of the UK’s most vulnerable families are sinking in bureaucracy and we owe it to them to give them a voice and press for change,” CAP chief executive Matt Barlow said.

The charity, which helps people struggling to get by, found three key areas that urgently need addressing – as well as revealing some of the heartbreaking stories of the people who’ve been hurt by the mass-adoption of the new benefit.

CAP’s three biggest areas of concern are the online application, the wait for the first payment and the lack of understanding of how many people are truly vulnerable.

This is important, raising an issue many here have mentioned,

There is no paper form to apply to claim Universal Credit, you do it online. Worse, you can’t save the form half way through the process.

And that’s causing big problems for some people.

Those without internet access can be forced to travel to a library to use computers there. But this is typically only free for an hour a day.

You need details of past addresses and identification when filling it out, meaning if you’ve travelled to get to a computer, and have forgotten something, you need to go back only to return later and start the whole process again.

“This can lead to a real feeling of hopelessness and for someone very vulnerable be the difference between being helped by the welfare system and not,” CAP said.

This, now called ‘digital exclusion’ is a growing problem.

More on this report:

With one million people already claiming Universal Credit and another seven million still to transition, now is a key time to check in with these early claimants.

This series of papers explores the problems and hardship experienced by claimants and highlights areas where policymakers’ attention is needed.

The roll-out is a huge task and there have been changes made to improve the transition for many people (see CAP’s policy note here, but there is more to do. Download the papers below to read about the impact that claiming Universal Credit has had on people

Applying and waiting for Universal Credit


(December 2018)
Download now

  • Digital exclusion is a significant challenge, with access as well as capability a key issue.
  • Waiting for payments to start causes financial hardship and emotional distress.
  • There is considerable vulnerability amongst early Universal Credit claimants

Is the government listening?

Like hell – pardon padre – they are.

The Tory Government’s responses to us over Universal Credit are scarcely believable

Liverpool Echo.

When we asked about the fears and concerns of residents in the deprived areas of West Derby and Everton – where UC is rolling out this month – Work and Pensions Minister Alok Sharma painted a very rosy picture, stating: “Universal Credit is central to our commitment to help families improve their lives by moving into work.

“We know it’s working – with Universal Credit people are moving into work faster and staying in work longer than under the old system.

“And now we are rolling it out to a wider range of people in a safe and controlled way.

“In Everton and West Derby single jobseekers are already receiving support from their dedicated work coach to find employment or increase their hours and earnings.

“Now, all types of claimants will be able to benefit from the improved, personalised, one-to-one support that Universal Credit offers.”

The Echo, to their credit had done some serious digging into the dirt.

The problems with UC have been well documented and include delays in handing over vital cash, sanctions for simple mistakes and there simply not being enough money in the system.

We have told you about the man forced to eat out of supermarket bins because the jobcentre messed up his appointment.

Then there was the Bootle mum who suffers with agoraphobia – and doesn’t want to wake up most mornings because she can’t afford to feed her kids.

The problems with UC have been well documented and include delays in handing over vital cash, sanctions for simple mistakes and there simply not being enough money in the system.

We have told you about the man forced to eat out of supermarket bins because the jobcentre messed up his appointment.

Then there was the Bootle mum who suffers with agoraphobia – and doesn’t want to wake up most mornings because she can’t afford to feed her kids.

Their comment, in these conditions, is pretty mild,

Written by Andrew Coates

December 13, 2018 at 4:23 pm