Ipswich Unemployed Action.

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Archive for the ‘Suffolk’ Category

Thérèse Coffey plans to help millions back to work.

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DWP MInister Thérèse Coffey on her “Dream Job” and Universal Credit. | Ipswich Unemployed Action.

Coffey: Workers Experienced in Customer Care Can Retrain for New Jobs.

The DWP Minister Thérèse Coffey has stirred up controversy for her latest helpful suggestions.

The Mirror reports,

The government’s welfare chief has prompted fury by suggesting sacked cabin crew can retrain as carers.

Work and Pensions Secretary Therese Coffey claimed thousands of airline staff made redundant after planes were grounded and international travel ground to a halt in the coronavirus crisis should switch careers.

She told The Spectator: “I want to encourage them to perhaps go into teaching or go to college and to be the people who train the next lot of people who are going to do those jobs.”

She added: “How do we help draw out of them the transferable skills that they have, and that could be working in social care?

“It may not be their dream job for the rest of their lives.

“But it may well be very useful: They get more money coming in than if they’re on benefits and it can also provide something really valuable and rewarding.”

Yet Thérèse Coffey has defenders, well, at least one: the person who wrote the article that’s got people hot under the collar..

How Thérèse Coffey plans to help millions back to work

The Work and Pensions Secretary on unemployment, reshuffles and turning cabin crew into nurses

Writing for the popular Alternative View column, Davidus Toricus Spartacus, in the Spectator Katie Ball, née Bollocks (creator of  the podcast, Women with Balls, note, this is not made up) begins by noting, “Many things have gone wrong for the government over the past few months, but the welfare system has (so far) held up. “

My main task has been making sure that DWP runs effectively. Being in the news would probably be a sign that it wasn’t,’ she says over lunch in The Spectator’s boardroom. ‘I’m a great believer in the DWP being boringly brilliant — or brilliantly boring.’ After just 13 months in the job, she has already lasted longer than her last five predecessors.

We hope a ‘good lunch’ – the MP is much-loved in Suffolk Coastal for her support for local hostelries, sacrificing many hours visiting pubs, inns and ale-houses to support their work for the community – and this good feed put her in more than usual good spirits.

She thinks the social care industry could benefit from workers experienced in customer care such as air hostesses. ‘How do we help draw out of them the transferable skills that they have and that could be working in social care? It may not be their dream job for the rest of their lives. But it may well be very useful: they get more money coming in than if they’re on benefits and it can also provide something really valuable and rewarding so there are those sorts of things where we are going to try and help people think through what it is they can do, even if it is only for the next two to three years.’

She also supports Boris Johnson’s enthusiasm for air hostesses to become nurses. ‘I’m sure other cabin crew as well who are male could make equally good nurses. It’s just whether or not people want that as a complete lifestyle change.

Reflecting on issues that concern us, the well-being of her soul, she said,

As a practising Catholic who has missed mass on a Sunday only six times in her life, Coffey is more relaxed than most politicians when it comes to discussing faith. One of the upsides of lockdown, she says, was online church services: ‘We just basically did a tour of the UK. I’ve become quite fond of St George’s in Taunton, the St Gerard Majella in Bristol — very nice priest there. Northampton Cathedral is pretty good. A church crawl is a bit different to a pub crawl, isn’t it?’

We take this fine distinction on the word of a seasoned  veteran of many a tavern and rustic taproom.

Therese Coffey MP appointed Beer Parliamentarian of the Year after visiting all 118 pubs in her constituency

Will she ever be booted out?

She is the second-longest serving Tory work and pensions secretary, but would need to last until the next election to take first place from Iain Duncan Smith. There’s a rumour she confronted the Prime Minister a few months ago at cabinet about reshuffle reports in the press — he told her she wouldn’t be moved anytime soon. When I mention it, she blushes and won’t get into the details of what was discussed, but she does say rumours of hirings and firings are unhelpful, especially in a department where the lifespan of a Secretary of State is measured in weeks and months.

Written by Andrew Coates

October 9, 2020 at 3:13 pm

Unemployment Set for Big Rise as DWP Recruits New Staff.

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HRH The Duke and Duchess of Cambrige sit and talk with Anife, a newly appointed Work Coach.

Royalty Do Their Bit: Meeting a former claimant who recently joined the DWP as a Work Coach.

Ken reminds us that unemployment is set to rise, a lot.

This is the Guardian article he links to:

New Covid-19 restrictions mean UK unemployment will get much worse

Larry Elliot.

Bank of England forecasts for 7.5% unemployment this winter may have to be revised up considerably.

The clampdown could not have come at a worse time for the chancellor. Rishi Sunak has admitted that unemployment will rise over the coming months but he hoped that temporary cuts in VAT and stamp duty, together with his eat out to help out scheme, would limit the rise in joblessness.

Now the chancellor is coming under pressure to extend the furlough scheme, which has prevented the unemployment rate from rocketing by paying workers to stay at home.

Why?

Gordon Brown, who was in charge the last time Britain faced an economic crisis, used his first keynote speech to a Labour conference in a decade to call on Sunak to come up with a new economic recovery plan within days.

The former prime minister said job prospects were at their worst in 50 years. There were, he added, 2,932 applicants for a single warehouse job in Northumberland, 2,653 applicants for a factory job in Sunderland, 2,154 applicants for an administrative job in Coventry and 15,000 applicants for 10 assembly operative jobs in Birmingham.

The Federation of Small Businesses supported Brown’s call for urgent action. “Many businesses – particularly those at the heart of our night-time economy and events industries – are now seriously fearing for their futures,” said its national chairman, Mike Cherry.

What is going to happen?

As the wage subsidy scheme unwinds, the Bank of England expects unemployment to rise substantially, reaching 7.5% by the end of the year.

That, though, was before the new restrictions were announced. By winter’s end it could now be a lot higher than that.

What is the DWP doing?

Here is an indication:

 

This is coming:

Royalty has already been pitching in to help out.

DWP Boss Thérèse Coffey is doing her best to stimulate the economy (and it’s only a short drive from Ipswich, for those of us with a sturdy MPV with seating for six, and up to date Sat-Nat  to navigate the lonely, bus-free, back lanes and by-ways of Suffolk).

 

One could mention the Kickstart Scheme, but to the readers of this Blog the message below is the important one:

The Covid Pandemic  Denial Maniacs,  whose comments here keep mysteriously vanishing,are no doubt getting ready for a weekend piling up bog rolls, just in case.

 

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Written by Andrew Coates

September 23, 2020 at 5:42 pm

The 35 Hours a Week ‘Job-Search’: 2.3 million claimants for 90,939 Jobs.

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Image

35 Hours a Week!

The hard right Express takes a brief break today from whinging about Rule Britannia and Land of Hope and Glory.

Universal Credit UK: DWP warns payments will stop or reduce if you fail to do this

When claiming Universal Credit, a person will need to make an agreement with their work coach which is called a “Claimant Commitment”.

The requirements of things they need to do will depend on the individual person’s situation.

It may be that it includes activities such as writing a CV, looking and applying for jobs, or going on training courses.

The Express continues mentioning things like a change of circumstance, and everything else you have tell the DWP.

But it does not go into the detail of the “looking and applying for jobs.”

This is in interesting post which chimes with what people on this site have been saying for some time.

Absurd as 2.3 million Universal Credit claimants required to chase “90,939 Jobs” on DWP Jobsite (findajob.dwp.gov.uk)

It is absurd to require 2.3 million Universal Credit claimants to search for work up to 35 hours per week, or face severe financial penalties (benefit sanctions), when the DWP itself is only able to get UK employers to advertise just 90,939 jobs on it’s own website.

All UC claimants are required to accept a Claimant Commitment (CC) and this will include sanction based obligations to search for and prepare for work. It is highly probable that nearly all of the 2.3 million claimants will have a CC requirement to evidence creating a DWP ‘Find A Job’ (FAJ), uploading their CV to it and then using it to search and apply for work through FAJ.

 

And, as our contributors have already noted,

Followed by:

Enforcing the rule about jobsearch has always been a sore point.

If you are on one of these ‘courses’ it is not unknown to be stuck in front of a computer every day ‘doing’ jobsearch.

Or was, because nobody can exactly see these ‘courses’ operating at the moment.

Or making sure that everybody has access to the Web.

As katrehman says,

How do they expect claimants with no WiFi, landlines or even maybe no credit/Internet left on their PAYG mobile if they have a mobile, to search for jobs or spending an hour or two ringing employers? I have a PAY phone for a tenner per month I have 4GB Internet, fine as WiFi is included in my rent, plus unlimited minutes and texts, I work and top up on payday, but for those on 74 a week or even 94 this is A LOT of money! So I guess there’s still jobclubs and mandatory JCP job search sessions?

But the DWP is here to help!

 

The Minister is spreading joy:

All is going well.

Written by Andrew Coates

August 25, 2020 at 5:48 pm

Mass unemployment on the cards.

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UK headed for mass unemployment like the 1980s without urgent ...

“Eight people are claiming benefits support for every job opening”.

Two headlines in the Guardian.

Today: Eight people claiming employment support for every vacancy, says thinktank

Richard Partigan.

Analysis comes as some new vacancies in UK are receiving hundreds of applicants each

The number of people claiming unemployment benefits per job vacancy in Britain has increased fivefold since the onset of the coronavirus pandemic, according to an employment thinktank.

The Institute for Employment Studies (IES) said approximately eight people are claiming benefits support for every job opening, up from 1.5 people per job before the crisis began in March.

The number of job vacancies in Britain has plunged by almost half a million since January to 333,000 in June, hitting the lowest levels since comparable records began in 2001. With companies making redundancies, putting hiring plans on hold or furloughing their workers, the numbers of people claiming unemployment-related benefits has climbed by 112% since March to reach more than 2.6 million – resulting in an average of 7.8 benefit claimants per vacancy.

Last week it emerged a restaurant in Manchester had nearly 1,000 applications for a receptionist post within 24 hours, while pubs in London have also pulled in hundreds of applicant despite offering very few jobs.

As many as 9.5 million people – a third of the UK’s workforce – have been been placed on the government furlough scheme, which covers 80% of workers’ wages. However, economists fear that the Treasury closing the scheme at the end of October could trigger mass unemployment unparalleled since the 1980s.

Office for National Statistics:

Labour market overview, UK: July 2020

Estimates of employment, unemployment, economic inactivity and other employment-related statistics for the UK.

Also today: Recruiters inundated as virus takes toll on UK labour market

The jobseeker

‘I can see my mental health declining massively’

Ellie, based in Devon, has applied for 100 jobs since she was made redundant from a food service company the day before lockdown. She had been in the job for less than a month but with cafes and pubs closing, the business went downhill “really rapidly”. Ineligible for the government’s furlough scheme Ellie, 25, found herself out of work for the first time.

“I had a good few weeks of being really down and depressed. I didn’t have the strength to job hunt,” says Ellie. She eventually landed a temporary contract with a call centre in May but knows that the work could end at any time. “It’s really stressful not knowing if I could be let go tomorrow,” she says.

Our Boss is on the job immediately!

https://twitter.com/theresecoffey/status/1287855223495634945?s=20

Written by Andrew Coates

July 28, 2020 at 8:10 am

Claimants Moving to Universal Credit to Get Bonus.

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EXTRA 2 WEEKS' MONEY FOR THOSE MOVING TO UNIVERSAL CREDIT - Island ...

More Money for Some on Benefits as Unemployment Set to Soar.

This looks a fishy.

The DWP has announced that thousands of benefit recipients moving on to Universal Credit will receive up to two weeks of additional cash to provide them with extra support

Is there a catch?

Ah….

This one-time payment, known as a run-on, will help people during their first assessment period, and will not have to be paid back.

It’s been in place for housing benefit claimants for more than two years – and has benefited around 2.3million people so far according to DWP figures.

However, from this month, it will also be paid to those who join from child tax credit, income support, jobseeker’s allowance, employment and support allowance and working tax credit.

In total, it could help an estimated 1.1million households, according to one report seen by Birmingham Live.

What about those who remain on Legacy Benefits?

 

From Wednesday, July 22, if someone’s existing claim of income-based jobseeker’s allowance (JSA), income-related employment and support allowance (ESA) or income support ends due to them applying for universal credit, they will be eligible for a payment worth up to two weeks of their former benefit.

Anyone on the legacy benefits being replaced by Universal Credit is moved across when their circumstances change, such as moving home, losing their job or having a baby.

But….

Everyone else on the legacy benefits is expected to be moved across by September 24. This date is much later than originally forecast and will increase the cost of implementing Universal Credit to £4.6 billion.

So, it’s nothing for those on legacy benefits, who will remain deprived of the extra £20 a week Universal Credit claimants get.

In the meantime the mess that is Universal Credit was shown up in Court today.

Universal credit earnings calculations unlawful, judge says

Guardian

Single mother lost up to £463 a month due to four-weekly pay cycle not fitting rules

A working single parent who was benefit-capped and left up to £463 a month worse off because of the “irrational” way universal credit calculated her monthly earnings has won a high court victory against the Department for Work and Pensions.

The ruling – the second in less than a month in which the DWP’s guidelines for assessing universal credit earnings have been ruled unlawful – found the system was unreasonable and placed absurd conditions on benefit claimants who fell foul of it.

Universal Credit: Mum wins High Court fight against DWP

BBC.

A single working mother has won a High Court challenge against the Department for Work and Pensions over its “irrational” Universal Credit system.

Sharon Pantellerisco, from Merseyside, had her benefits cut as her employer paid her salary on a four-week basis.

However, if she had been paid a monthly salary, the reduction of up to £463 per month would not have been applied.

The High Court said the DWP’s method when calculating earnings in this case had been “irrational and unlawful”.

The DWP has been contacted for a comment.

The court heard how Ms Pantellerisco, from Southport, is the sole carer of her three dependent children who all live together along with her eldest child, who is now aged 19.

The 41-year-old is employed for 16 hours a week at the national living wage rate but, because she was paid on a four-week basis, this resulted in her falling short of the income threshold to avoid the benefit cap.

Watch out for this – seriously worrying for many people.

Looks like Coffey is thinking about her holidays (tweet with 3 likes!)

 

Written by Andrew Coates

July 20, 2020 at 5:48 pm