Ipswich Unemployed Action.

Campaigning for Unemployed Rights.

Archive for the ‘Government’ Category

Work and Health Programme’s Dire Results and Latest on Universal Credit.

Pluss launches Work and Health Programme | Pluss

Programme that’s Not Working.

The Work and Health Programme (WHP) aims to provide support to help people find and keep a job. It is
available to the following groups:

  • The Disability group is voluntary for disabled people as defined in the Equality Act 2010. This is the
    main group that the WHP is aimed at.
  • The Early Access group is voluntary and aimed at people who may need additional support to move
    into employment and are in one of a number of priority groups (e.g. homeless, ex-armed forces, care, leavers, refugees).
  • The Long-term unemployed group is mandatory and is for Jobseeker’s Allowance or Universal Credit claimants who have reached 24 months of unemployment

Disability Rights  noted in 2019,

9 out of 10 of Work and Health Programme participants do not have a job outcome

31 May 2019

9 out of 10 of Work and Health Programme (WHP) participants (88%) have not obtained a ‘job outcome’.

A ‘job outcome’ is work with earning above a threshold of 16 hours per week for 26 weeks at the National Living Wage, London Living Wage or Real Living Wage) or having completed six months in self-employment.

This week’s Private Eye, under the title, “Doleful Result”  carries the story’s latest turns.

They state that 15% of the people who began the welfare to work scheme, the Work and Health Programme from its  start in late 2017 till February 2019 (the latest available figures)  found a job.  That is “at least six months of self-employment of employment of 16 hours a week at, at least, the minimum wage.

They conclude, “Around two-thirds of participants haven’t earned a penny within a  year of joining the scheme, and half never do.”

This is from the latest DWP statement and  figures (next release of statistics in August 2020).

Work and Health Programme statistics to February 2020

The WHP predominantly helps disabled people, as well as the Long-Term Unemployed and the Early Access group (which is made up of certain priority groups) to enter into and stay in work.

People are referred by jobcentres to work with organisations known as providers, from the public, private and voluntary sectors. The providers are paid a service delivery fee as well as outcome-related payments when a person reaches either:

Here are the outcomes:

Since the WHP began there have been:

  • 166,160 referrals for 138,330 individuals
  • 103,300 starts
  • 13,710 job outcomes

Note: those starting more recently have had shorter time to achieve a job outcome, therefore it is not meaningful to divide the number of job outcomes by the number of starts or referrals.

Note how low the job outcomes look in this table:

Another statistic:

69% of all individuals referred by August 2019 have started the programme, and of these, so far 15% have reached the job outcomes earnings threshold or 6 months of being in self-employment by February 2020.

If you wish to, you can read the list of failure in the rest of the document.

Meanwhile the Civil Service News reports,

The Department for Work and Pensions is facing calls to give an “urgent lifeline” to recipients of Universal Credit, after a study found six in ten families claiming the benefir have been forced to borrow money since the beginning of the coronavirus crisis.

The latest study from the Joseph Rowntree Foundation and Save The Children found families have been increasingly forced to rely on payday loans or credit cards to ensure they can afford food and pay bills during the pandemic.

It came as the latest official figures released on Monday showed the UK’s “claimant count” – including both those on Jobseeker’s Allowance and Universal Credit – had soared to 2.8 million in May.

Don’t forget!

More on the reports:

Written by Andrew Coates

June 18, 2020 at 3:45 pm

The New Universal Credit Claimants.

Coronavirus (COVID-19) & Universal Credit Important Announcement ...

DWP Picture with Tasteless Cartoon Images of the Virus.

Our contributors, campaigners, including this Blog, have been critical of Universal Credit from its creation.

However careful and sensitive we wish to be it’s impossible not to see ways in which UC has created difficulties for the enormous numbers of people now having to claim the benefit.

It’s no good trying to cover this up.

The BBC reports,

 

 

Some people applying for universal credit for the first time have found themselves worse off after losing their existing benefit payments.

The system means legacy benefits such as tax credits are stopped at the point of application, even if the claim proves to be unsuccessful.
One applicant said his family was worse off “at the click of a button”.

Universal credit claims have soared amid the coronavirus outbreak, with the next figures published on Tuesday.

 

It is obvious that these kind of difficulties are the tip of a giant iceberg of problems facing the new Universal Credit claimants.

The numbers claiming are set to rise and rise.

 

 

Faced with the crisis the DWP Minister, Therese Coffey, seems, on her twitter feed, to be more concerned with scoring political points against Keir Starmer and Sadiq Khan, and a “nice weekend on Suffolk Coast” than doing her job sorting out these kind of problems.

This, suitably grim Opera, based on an even grimmer poem about a cruel fisherman, a miserable tale located in a hamlet just next to Suffolk seaside town, Aldburgh, is our Minister’s night-time entertainment.

She re-tweeted this…

 

Peter Grimes.    George Crabbe.

“Peter Grimes is part of a collection of rural poems published by George Crabbe in 1810 called ‘The Borough’. This poem explores the criminal psyche.”

Old Peter Grimes made fishing his employ,
His wife he cabin’d with him and his boy,
And seem’d that life laborious to enjoy:
To town came quiet Peter with his fish,
And had of all a civil word and wish.
He left his trade upon the sabbath-day,
And took young Peter in his hand to pray:
But soon the stubborn boy from care broke loose,
At first refused, then added his abuse:
His father’s love he scorn’d, his power defied,
But being drunk, wept sorely when he died.

I did this poem for ‘O’ level English literature…..

Written by Andrew Coates

May 18, 2020 at 6:37 am

Outrage as Homeless to be thrown back into the streets.

This story has been developing all morning.

There is plenty more in the pipeline as evictions are set to start again in June.

More information from contributors, and is more than likely that we know people affected by the above, welcome.

But what we need is to stop this now!

Written by Andrew Coates

May 15, 2020 at 10:08 am

Coronavirus and Universal Credit Claimants.

Image result for coronavirus universal credit

 

Devon Live reports today,

Families in receipt of DWP benefits are being urged to contact their local jobcentre if they suspect they have come down with associated COVID-19 symptoms

They continue,

One of those is how those in receipt of DWP welfare benefits would be affected should they show worrying signs.

Families in receipt of Universal Credit already know cash penalties are imposed if they fail to meet a range of critera. That could be failing to turn up to interviews, not applying for work or claiming more than they’re entitled to (i.e. their medical needs are not as serious as what they have documented).

Claimants who fall ill with suspected coronavirus could be prevented from doing any one of those things.

So here’s a crucial guide outlining in full what welfare recipients need to do in order to avoid benefit sanctions.

Important – contact your local Jobcentre

Some claimants could have their payout docked if they fail to properly notify job centres, experts warn.

The new welfare system requires most claimants to fulfil a set number of hours of paid work or job hunting in order to receive the monthly payment.

Concerns have been raised about payments being docked if claimants fail to properly notify job centres about being unable to work due to restrictions on public transport or having to look after a child in the event of a school closure related to the coronavirus spread.

Charities are urging the government to ensure Universal Credit is “flexible enough to accommodate situations like this”.

Citizens Advice:

If you’re claiming benefits or asked to go to a medical assessment

You should still go to your usual appointments, for example at the Jobcentre Plus. You should also still go to any medical assessments – for example for ESA or PIP.

If you don’t, you might not get the money you’re entitled to.

If you’re ill and can’t go to your appointment, phone the office paying your benefit to explain why you can’t go.

If you’re claiming Universal Credit, you’ll need to use your online journal to explain why you can’t go to your appointment.

You can find out more about getting Universal Credit if you’re sick.

 

Coronavirus: Calls for emergency legislation to protect Universal Credit claimants

Welfare Weekly.

Both Labour and the SNP have called on the Prime Minister to provide emergency legislation to protect workers’ rights and ensure people receiving Universal Credit do not face sanctions if they are unable to make an appointment due to the coronavirus outbreak.

In Prime Minister’s Questions, Ian Blackford MP asked that while the Governor of the Bank of England suggested a ‘financial bridge’ may be available to assist markets through any economic volatility, would there will also be a ‘financial bridge’ for ordinary workers and those on social security.

He said statutory pay must be in line with the Living Wage, and Universal Credit claimants must not face sanctions.

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn also urged the Prime Minister to ensure that workers and benefit claimants are protected from hardship, should they need to self-isolate and are unable to work or attend Jobcentre appointments.

The Prime Minister announced during PMQ’s that rules on statutory sickpay will be changed to allow Coronavirus patients to claim from the first day of their sickness.

But with many workers such as freelancers and the self-employed ineligible for sick-pay, opposition parties warned that those affected may be forced to choose between their health and financial security.

Commenting, SNP Westminster Leader Ian Blackford MP said: “All of us must provide clear, calm and practical leadership in the days ahead.

Update:

This appeared a couple of days ago, and is becoming more and more worth considering:

Johnny Void: With Coronavirus Around The Corner It’s Time To Scrap Sanctions And Brutal Benefit Assessments

More:

 

Written by Andrew Coates

March 6, 2020 at 12:18 pm

DWP Bosses get over £1 Million in “Performance Bonuses.”

Image result for universal credit depression

 

DWP bosses pocket over £1 million in ‘performance bonuses’ after slashing benefits for Britain’s poorest

Welfare Weekly.

“It beggars belief that DWP chiefs are taking big handouts while families across the country are struggling.”

Senior officials at the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) have been gifted with eye-watering bonuses despite rising poverty and record numbers of people turning to food banks to feed themselves and their families, it has been revealed.

Information published by the DWP reveals that DWP bosses were handed £595,392 in “end of year” bonuses in 2017/18 and further £544,745 in the following year.

The shocking revelation has sparked anger and disbelief at the bonanza of bonuses awarded to DWP officials, who together have helped to implement some of the harshest cuts to social security benefits in living memory.

This happened a a few days ago but, unfortunately, I did not notice much of this reaction:

Poverty has soared under the Tory Government but DWP civil servants have pocketed extra cash.

So it continues:

And,

Still she’d got time for a good feed while tackling the really important issues:

 

Written by Andrew Coates

March 1, 2020 at 2:44 pm